Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

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You can create the most delicious plant-based “meatballs” ever with this delicious recipe for Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs. All you need to do is mix up pulses (beans, lentils, peas), grains, nuts, seeds, and seasonings, then shape into balls, and bake until they are golden and delicious.

Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

The best vegan meatballs

The inspiration for these vegan meatballs is in the Greek culinary tradition of keftedes—meatballs often served with French fries and a salad or as part of a meze (appetizer) platter. I skipped the meat and replaced it with hearty black-eyed peas (I had the most amazing black-eyed pea dish in Greece years ago which helped inspired this recipe!), along with nut meal, flax seeds, and red onions. The tastes of the Mediterranean are highlighted in this dish with dates, sun-dried tomatoes, and Greek herbs. These Greek vegan meatballs are paired with a bright lemony tahini dip.

Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

What are black eyed peas?

Black eyed peas recipes are rich in protein and fiber, making them an excellent protein alternative. Plus, the flax seeds and nut meal (also called nut flour) provide an extra dose of fiber and protein, along with healthy fats. This is the perfect way to do Meatless Monday, or fit in more plant-based meals during the week. You can even use these vegan meatballs in sauces over pasta or with a rich mushroom gravy.

Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

How to eat vegan meatballs

Serve these Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs at your holiday table or party for a meatless alternative, or for a simple, rustic meal served with roasted potato wedges and a crisp salad. The veggie meatballs are also excellent heated up over the next few days. You can even make a big batch and freeze extras for easy meals on busy nights.

Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

Step-By-Step Guide:

Combine all of the ingredients to make a slightly moistened mixture before refrigerating it for 30 minutes.
Process all of the ingredients for the veggie balls in a food processor, then chill for 30 minutes.
Roll golf-size veggie balls using your hands.
Roll golf-size veggie balls, using your hands, then bake at 375 F for 55-60 minutes.
Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs
Serve with tahini lemon sauce.

Watch me make this recipe on my Instagram video here.

Follow along with me as I make this recipe for Chef AJ’s live cooking show in my own kitchen here.

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Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs

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4.2 from 49 reviews

  • Author: The Plant-Powered Dietitian
  • Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes (including chill time)
  • Yield: 8 servings
  • Diet: Vegan

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Description

These savory little Greek Black Eyed Peas Vegan Meatballs are filled with the Mediterranean flavors of black-eyed peas, herbs, dates, and sun-dried tomatoes—served with a tangy Tahini Lemon Sauce.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium red onion, chopped into chunks
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 5 small soft dates, coarsely chopped
  • ¼ cup sliced sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • Pinch sea salt (optional)
  • ¼ cup ground flax seeds
  • ½ cup whole wheat breadcrumbs (may use gluten-free)
  • ½ cup nut meal (i.e., almond meal, hazelnut meal, or peanut meal)
  • 1 large lemon, juiced
  • 2 (15-ounce cans) black-eyed peas, rinsed, drained (or 3 ½ cups cooked)

Tahini Lemon Sauce:

  • 1/3 cup tahini
  • 1 large lemon, juiced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • Water, as needed
  • Smoked paprika

Instructions

  1. In the container of a food processor, place red onion, garlic, dates, sun-dried tomatoes, parsley, fennel seeds, oregano, black pepper, and salt (optional). Process until finely chopped.
  2. Add flax seeds, breadcrumbs, nut flour, and lemon juice to food processor, and process until combined.
  3. Add black-eyed peas to food processor, and process just until the peas are mashed, but not pureed. May need to pause and scrape down sides.
  4. Remove mixture from food processor and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  5. Meanwhile, make Tahini Lemon Sauce by whisking together tahini with lemon juice, garlic, and black pepper. Add enough water to make a smooth sauce, according to your desired texture. (A thicker sauce is preferable served on the side with appetizer vegan meatballs, while a thinner sauce is preferable served on top of an entrée serving of vegan meatballs.) Sprinkle with smoked paprika.
  6. Preheat oven to 375 F.
  7. Roll into about 40 small balls (about 1 1/2-inches to 2-inches in diameter) with your hands, and place on a baking sheet sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Place on top rack of the oven. Bake for about 45 minutes, until vegan balls are cooked through and golden brown on surface.
  8. Serve with Tahini Lemon Sauce.
  9. Make 8 servings (5 vegan meatballs + 1 1/2 tablespoons sauce)

Notes

To make this recipe gluten-free, use gluten-free breadcrumbs.

  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Category: Dinner
  • Cuisine: Greek, Mediterranean, American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 serving
  • Calories: 254
  • Sugar: 12 g
  • Sodium: 415 mg
  • Fat: 9 g
  • Saturated Fat: 2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 38 g
  • Fiber: 8 g
  • Protein: 10 g

Keywords: vegan meatballs, vegan meatballs recipe, how to cook meatballs, meatballs in oven, how long to bake meatballs, best vegan meatballs, how to cook black eyed peas, are black eyed peas beans, how long to cook black eyed peas

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For other veggie balls recipes, try some of my favorite recipes:

White Bean Sage Vegan Meatballs with Pomegranate Mandarin Sauce
Golden Beet Vegan Meatballs with Almond Sage Cranberry Crema

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